A Rhino Lift
  • A Rhino Lift 
     
    (Featured on National Geographic. http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2014/05/01/flight-of-the-rhino-a-remarkable-new-way-to-relocate-african-wildlife/ )
     
    There aren’t many people who get to witness a Rhino lift. I had no idea what I was in for joining the team to document how it all happens. It’s a new procedure, which is gentle on the darted rhino as it shortens the time the animal is kept drugged. As well as its respiration not being compromised like a net would. It avoids the need to travel over dodgy roads in a crate, which is how a rhino was transported in the past.
    The Rhinos are airlifted using an old Vietnam Huey, which in itself is an adventure. They are lifted roughly 500 – 1000 meters into the air suspended by their ankles. 
    There is a crew of 3 vets, 3 pilots, roughly 5 ground staff and a game capture manger. What stood out the most is how precise this operation is. Every single man has an invaluable role to play. It’s a team effort! 

    Megan Lategan from Wildlife Act describes the operation in more detail. “Game Capture and relocation is done for the benefit of the species and to ensure the strength of future bloodlines. It is a complex procedure and is only done when absolutely necessary.”
    “Thankfully the techniques used for rhino capture and relocation have significantly improved in recent years, gone are the days of large drug doses and corralling a dazed animal into a convenient location. As strange as it may seem airlifts are the best way to move these massive creatures, it allows them to be captured from any location; the rhino spends less time under anaesthetic and ultimately endures less stress from the procedure. The significant improvement in this area has led to a marked increase in the success of relocating white rhino.”

    Source: http://wildlifeact.com/blog/white-rhino-airlift/
Description
Safely relocating a Rhino.
Fields
Digital Photography, Photography, Photojournalism
Date
2014